On my tour around South Africa we also had about 2 days in Swaziland. We stayed very close to a traditional village – not just an act, but a village where they actually lived their lives the way they had always done. We were invited to come and have a look.

swaziland village

All us girls had to put on these red scarves with a picture of Swaziland’s king on the front. No need for the men.

swaziland village

swaziland village

We were asked to wait outside while our guide (from the village) went inside to announce our visit. A couple of minutes later we could go in.

swaziland village

Inside we were greeted by the (female) leader of the village, and many of the other inhabitants, both adults and children. Then they sat us down so they could tell us about how they led their lives, and show us their instruments for sleeping, getting water, making flour and lots of other things.

swaziland village

She was quite the character! She spoke in her own language and let our guide translate.

swaziland village

And then they made us dance! First us girls:

swaziland village

And then the men:

swaziland village

With the help of the kids (they were much better than the men):

swaziland village

Demonstration over, they opened up their little market so we could get us some Swaziland souvenirs.

swaziland village

swaziland village

I got myself a little elephant made out of soft stone that is currently sitting right next to me on my table. I thought it was pretty hard in general, in Africa, not to get something at the markets – so many beautiful (and cheap) things!

swaziland village

We joked a little with ‘oh, we’ve gone all this way to Swaziland just to take photos of cats’, but, what can you do. Cats are cute everywhere!

swaziland village

And so are the dogs..!

swaziland village

swaziland village

I think we were only in the village for maybe an hour and a half before we started getting back to our truck.

swaziland village

swaziland village

swaziland village

I was a little disappointed that we didn’t actually get to ‘visit the village’ as in walking between their houses, but only saw their main square, but for what it was it was definitely an interesting experience. It’s a culture that is vastly different from my own, not just in how they get by from day to day but in politics and family relations and so much else.

Have you been to Swaziland? Did you experience their traditional way of living? Comment below!

Read more:
My First Kruger Safari Photo Journal: 3 Out Of 5!
My Second Kruger Safari Photo Journal: The Last 2

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